Justified

1Corinthians 6:11 And such were some of you: but you are washed, but ye are sanctified, but you are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God. 

‘Such were some of you.’ The first five classes of 1Corinthians 6:9-10 have to do with the worst immoralities imaginable and yet it is declared that some of their kind is now saved.

‘But you are washed, but you are sanctified, but you are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God.’ Three things that save the soul: [1] Washed. The Greek word apolouo from apo; away from and louo, to wash the whole being, not a part of it. It is used in Acts 22:16 for complete washing from sins; not by baptism, but by calling upon the name of the Lord, as in Joel 2:32; Acts 2:21 and Romans 10:9-14. Here it is used for complete washing from the sins of 1Corinthians 6:9-10 by calling on the name of Jesus Christ and by the Holy Spirit (1Cor. 6:11). The Greek: louo without the preposition apo, is used for washing from all sins (Rev. 1:5); the whole feet (John 13:10); the whole body (Acts 9:37; Heb. 10:22); the whole sow (2Pet. 2:22); and all the stripes of Paul and Silas (Acts 16:33). [2] Sanctified. [Greek: hagiazo] to hallow, consecrate, separate from sin unto God (John 17:17). Note how this is put before justification (1Cor. 6:11). [3] Justified. [Greek: dikaioo] to declare righteous or not guilty; justify. It is translated “freed from sin” (Rom. 6:7); “justifier” (Rom. 3:26); “be righteous” (Rev. 22:11); and “justify” 33 times. One is justified the moment he repents and is forgiven (Luke 18:14; Acts 13:39; Rom. 3:24, 28, 30; 4:5; 5:1, 9; 1Cor. 6:11; Gal. 2:16-17; 3:8, 24; Tit. 3:5-7).

Ten proofs when people are justified: when they are washed and sanctified (1Cor. 6:11; 2Cor. 5:17-18); when they repent (Luke 18:13-14); when they believe (Acts 13:38-39; Rom. 3:24-31; 4:5; 5:1; Gal. 2-3); when redeemed (Rom. 3:24; 5:9); when they partake of grace (Rom. 3:24-25; 5:1-2; Tit. 2:11-14; 3:4-7); when they accept God’s call (Rom. 8:30); when born again (Tit. 3:4-7; 1Jn. 2:29; 3:9; 5:1-4, 18; 2Cor. 5:17-18); when brought to Christ (Gal. 3:24; 2Cor. 5:17-18; Gal. 3:27); when reconciled (Rom. 5:9-11; 2Cor. 5:17-21; Col. 1:20-23); when all sins are blotted out (Isa. 43:25; Acts 13:38-39; 1Cor. 6:11). Justification is used of the final settlement between people (Job 11:2; 13:18; 27:5; 32:2; 33:32; Pro. 17:15; Luke 10:29; 16:15); of people clearing God of all wrong (Ps. 51:4; Luke 7:29; Rom. 3:26); and of people justifying themselves of all guilt (Jer. 3:11; Ezek. 16:51-52; Job 9:20; 13:18; 32:2; Luke 16:15). Thus the meaning is clear – to declare not guilty. The justification of man by God simply means that God washes, sanctifies the believer, and declares him no longer guilty (1Cor. 6:9-11; 2Cor. 5:17-18; Acts 13:38-39). God cannot declare one not guilty before he is cleansed from all sin and made holy by the blood of Christ. Sanctification makes the sinner not guilty; justification declares him not guilty.

Being Justified by Faith

Romans 5:1 Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. 

‘Justified by faith’ The Greek word for justified dikaioo means to declare righteous or not guilty; justify. It is translated “freed from sin” (6:7); “justifier” (3:26); “be righteous” (Rev. 22:11); and “justify” 33 times. One is justified the moment he repents and is forgiven (Luke 18:14; Acts 13:39; Rom. 3:24, 28, 30; 4:5; 5:1, 9; 1Cor. 6:11; Gal. 2:16-17; 3:8, 24; Tit. 3:5-7).

Proofs when people are justified: When they are washed and sanctified (1Cor. 6:11; 2Cor. 5:17-18). When they repent (Luke 18:13-14); and believe (3:24-31; 4:5; 5:1; Acts 13:38-39; Gal. 2-3). When redeemed (3:24; 5:9) and when they partake of grace (3:24-25; 5:1-2; Tit. 2:11-14; 3:4-7). When they accept God’s call (8:30) and when they are born again (Tit. 3:4-7; 1Jn. 2:29; 3:9; 5:1-4, 18; 2Cor. 5:17-18). When brought to Christ (Gal. 3:24; 2Cor. 5:17-18; Gal. 3:27) and when reconciled (5:9-11; 2Cor. 5:17-21; Col. 1:20-23). When all sins are blotted out (Isa. 43:25; Acts 13:38-39; 1Cor. 6:11).

Justification is used of the final settlement between people (Job 11:2; 13:18; 27:5; 32:2; 33:32; Pro. 17:15; Luke 10:29; 16:15); of people clearing God of all wrong (Ps. 51:4; Luke 7:29; Rom. 3:26); and of people justifying themselves of all guilt (Jer. 3:11; Ezek. 16:51-52; Job 9:20; 13:18; 32:2; Luke 16:15). Thus the meaning is clear: to declare not guilty. The justification of man by God simply means that God washes, sanctifies the believer, and declares him no longer guilty (1Cor. 6:9-11; 2Cor. 5:17-18; Acts 13:38-39). God cannot declare one not guilty before he is cleansed from all sin and made holy by the blood of Christ. Sanctification makes the sinner not guilty; justification declares him not guilty.

‘We have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ’ this is the peace that is described in Philippians 4:7 “And the peace of God, which passes all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.”

Ten Blessings of Romans 5:1-21: Justification (5:1, 9); peace with God (5:1); access by faith into grace (5:2); standing in grace (5:2); joy in God (5:2-3, 11); grace in tribulations (5:3-5); love of God in the heart (5:5); the Holy Spirit (5:5); salvation from wrath (5:9-10); reconciliation by blood (5:10-11).

Abraham Justified by Faith

Romans 4:1-8 What shall we say then that Abraham our father, as pertaining to the flesh, has found? For if Abraham were justified by works, he has whereof to glory; but not before God. For what said the scripture? Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness. Now to him that works is the reward not reckoned of grace, but of debt. But to him that work not, but believe on him that justify the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness. Even as David also described the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputed righteousness without works, Saying, Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin. 

‘What shall we say then that Abraham our father, as pertaining to the flesh, has found? … For what said the scripture?’ Paul here (4:1-3), after proving in Romans 3:21-31 that both Jews and Gentiles could only be saved by grace through faith, shows by examples how Abraham and David were justified. Abraham, the father of the Jewish nation, was a heathen, an uncircumcised Gentile, before God pardoned him by grace through faith. He could not have been justified by obedience to the law, which was not until 430 years later (Gal. 3:17). Paul points out that Abraham was pardoned the same way the gospel saves Jews and Gentiles. Why should the Jews condemn Christianity and oppose Gentiles when they were included in the Abrahamic covenant (Gen. 12:1-3; 17:4)? Paul also proves that this blessing did not come through circumcision, for Abraham had it many years before he was circumcised (4:9-12; Gen. 12:1-3; 15:6; 17:1-14). If Abraham was blessed before and without circumcision, then Gentiles also could be.

‘Our father’ Jews claimed Abraham as their father (9:5; Luke 1:73; John 8:39; Acts 7:2).

‘Believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness’ before he was circumcised (Gen. 15:6).

‘Now to him that works is the reward not reckoned of grace, but of debt’ if Abraham worked for and merited justification, then it was not of grace because God owed it to him. But if he believed God for it instead of working for it, then faith was counted for righteousness and God gave it to him as a favour. Since he was called when he was a Gentile idolater and he was justified freely by faith, then all other sinners can likewise be justified (3:21-28; 5:1-11). ‘Even as David also described the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputed righteousness without works’ now the apostle proves his point by showing how David, a man under law, was justified by faith without the law and works (4:6-7; Ps. 32:1-2). Quoting Psalm 32:1-2 “…Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. Blessed is the man unto whom the LORD imputes not iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no guile.” A fourfold blessing is noted here of the blessed man: His sins are forgiven; his sins are covered; his forgiven sins are no longer imputed to him and his spirit is cleansed of guile (Ps. 15:1-5; 24:3-5).