His Meat

John 4:27-34 And upon this came his disciples, and marvelled that he talked with the woman: yet no man said, What seek thou? or, Why talk thou with her? The woman then left her waterpot, and went her way into the city, and say to the men, Come, see a man, which told me all things that ever I did: is not this the Christ? Then they went out of the city, and came unto him. In the meanwhile his disciples prayed him, saying, Master, eat. But he said unto them, I have meat to eat that you know not of. Therefore said the disciples one to another, Hath any man brought him ought to eat? Jesus says unto them, My meat is to do the will of him that sent me, and to finish his work. 

The disciples marvelled, not only because there were no dealings between Jews and Samaritans, but because Jewish etiquette and the Talmud forbade Rabbis to converse with women in public or instruct them in the law. No Rabbi could even converse with his wife, sister, or daughter in public and in the street.

The woman then left her waterpot, and went into the city, and said to the men there” “Come, see a man, which told me all things that ever I did: is not this the Christ?” It may be that Christ did tell her all about her life, so her report was no exaggeration.

‘I have meat to eat that you know not of’ Jesus referred to refreshment or soul satisfaction that they have not learned. He delighted in converting the Samaritans (John 4:34).

‘My meat is to do the will of him that sent me’ – Jesus did the will of His Father and that is the true sustenance of life for us, to do God’s will (Rom. 12:1-2; 1Jn. 2:17) and to accomplish what we were created for – no matter what we choose as a profession or where to life or whom to marry – to represent Christ on earth so that others can by our walk in life, be turned to a godly life (1Pet. 2:21-22).

Calling of the First Disciples

John 1:35-42  Again the next day after John stood, and two of his disciples; And looking upon Jesus as he walked, he saith, Behold the Lamb of God! And the two disciples heard him speak, and they followed Jesus. Then Jesus turned, and saw them following, and saith unto them, What seek you? They said unto him, Rabbi, (which is to say, being interpreted, Master,) where dwell thou? He saith unto them, Come and see. They came and saw where he dwelt, and abode with him that day: for it was about the tenth hour. One of the two which heard John speak, and followed him, was Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother. He first finds his own brother Simon, and saith unto him, We have found the Messias, which is, being interpreted, the Christ. And he brought him to Jesus. And when Jesus beheld him, he said, Thou art Simon the son of Jona: thou shalt be called Cephas, which is by interpretation, A stone. 

Two of John the Baptist’s disciples, the one was Andrew (Peter’s brother), the other probably John the Apostle, as he never mentions himself in this book. They looked upon (Jesus) the Greek word emblepo, which means to look with fixed eyes upon or look intently as they heard John the Baptist say: “Behold the Lamb of God!” A symbol of Christ used thirty-two times in the Bible.

Andrew and John asked Jesus “Rabbi, (which means Master) where dwell thou?” Jesus told them, “Come and see.” So, they came and saw where He stayed and stayed with Him for that day because it was already the tenth hour – 4 pm.

‘found the Messias’ Finding Jesus changes one’s life (2Cor. 5:17-18). Messias is the Greek transliteration of the Hebrew Mashiyach, meaning anointed (John 4:25; 1Sam. 2:10, 35; Psa. 2:2; Dan. 9:25-26). The equivalent of mashiyach in the Greek is Christos, used of Jesus 569 times in the New Testament.

‘Cephas’ is the Aramaic word for stone (1Cor. 1:12; 3:22; 9:5; 15:5; Gal. 2:9). And ‘stone’ is the Greek word petros which means little stone, rock and 161 other places translated “Peter”. This shows how Jesus could judge a man at the first look. He knew Peter to be firm and strong in soul, and hard and unyielding in purpose.