The Parable of the Scribe

Then said he unto them, Therefore every scribe which is instructed unto the kingdom of heaven is like unto a man that is an householder, which bringeth forth out of his treasure things new and old. Mat. 13:52 KJV

Christ, the householder, authorizes His disciples to be scribes and in this parable, the scribe is the individual follower of Christ, who is sufficiently instructed in the things of the kingdom of Heaven to have a treasure of knowledge of things both new and old. He is “like” an householder which has treasures both new and old to bring out for the benefit of those in need. This illustrates the mixture of old and new truths in the members of the kingdom of Heaven, which enables them to be ready for all emergencies in instructing others in the things of the kingdom of Heaven. Both old and new truths are good. Both are necessary and helpful if the disciple is to be a workman unto God, needing not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of Truth in the realm of profession. Ministers must thoroughly understand truth and be able to disperse it abroad. “Things new and old” is a Jewish idiom of great plenty.

The Parable of the Net

Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a net, that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind:  Which, when it was full, they drew to shore, and sat down, and gathered the good into vessels, but cast the bad away. Mat. 13:47-48 KJV

The net illustrates the kingdom of Heaven or realm of profession gathering both good and bad from the sea of humanity. The good and bad remain in the net until the end of the age, when they are separated. This parable shows that not all in the kingdom of Heaven will be converted, much less the whole world, as taught by many.

So shall it be at the end of the world: the angels shall come forth, and sever the wicked from among the just, And shall cast them into the furnace of fire: there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth. Mat. 13:49-50 KJV

The separation of the evil ones from the good ones takes place at the end of the age, as in the parable of the tares and the wheat. Mt. 13:30, 40, 43, 49-50 The destiny of both classes in both parables is the same.

The parable of the tares and wheat teaches a mixture of good and bad, as well as the purpose and origin of the bad, while this parable teaches that this mixture will continue until the end and that the enemy who caused the bad would be defeated and that the bad will be cast away. The main truth illustrated by this parable is the universal aspect of the sphere of profession. Wherever the net is cast it gathers both classes of people regardless of who they are or what they may be in life and conduct.

The Parable of the Hidden Treasure

Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto treasure hid in a field; the which when a man has found, he hide, and for joy thereof go and sell all that he had, and buy that field. Mat. 13:44 KJV

The treasure illustrates Israel in the kingdom of Heaven, partaking in the kingdom or realm of profession in this age. She, Israel, is like a treasure Ps. 135:4; Ex. 19:5; Mal. 3:17 hidden or lying in the world in the sense that Israel’s testimony as witnesses for God is veiled, Rom. 9:111:29  lying dormant and failing to fulfill her calling. The field is the world as in all preceding parables. Mt. 13:38 The treasure was not in the world when the devil took possession of it. When Christ came to seek the treasure it was hidden in the world. The man is Christ Mt. 13:34,37 seeking the treasure. Jn. 1:11-12; Mt. 23:37-39 and joyfully gives His all to buy the field Jn. 11:51; Rom. 8:17-25; 1 Pet. 1:18-19; 2 Pet. 2:1 to get the treasure and all else in the field. Php. 2:5-8; 2Cor. 8:9; Tit. 2:14; Heb. 12:1-2 The treasure, though found, Mt. 10:6; 15:24; 23:37-39; Acts 13:46 remains hidden in the world until Christ comes to take possession of it at His second coming. Rom. 11:25-29; Lk. 21:24; Lk. 1:32-33; Isa. 9:6-7 Then the treasure, as well as the field, will be His. Eph. 1:14; Rom. 11:25-28; Lk. 21:24; Rev. 19-20; Rom. 8:17-25 His joy in giving all for the field is experienced in view of the glorious restoration of all things and the treasure, Israel, exalted and made a blessing to all nations as originally planned. Heb. 12:2; Rom. 11; Lk. 1:32-35; Isa. 9:6-7