Concerning Israel

Romans 9:25-29 As he said also in Osee, I will call them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved, which was not beloved. And it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, You are not my people; there shall they be called the children of the living God. Esaias also cried concerning Israel, Though the number of the children of Israel be as the sand of the sea, a remnant shall be saved: For he will finish the work, and cut it short in righteousness: because a short work will the Lord make upon the earth. And as Esaias said before, Except the Lord of Sabaoth had left us a seed, we had been as Sodom, and been made like unto Gomorrah. 

‘Osee, I will call them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved, which was not beloved’ this is the 3rd Old Testament prophecy fulfilled in Romans (9:25; Hos. 2:23).

‘And it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, You are not my people; there shall they be called the children of the living God’ this is the 4th Old Testament prophecy fulfilled in Romans (9:26; Hos. 1:9-10).

‘Though the number of the children of Israel be as the sand of the sea, a remnant shall be saved …’ this is the 5th Old Testament prophecy fulfilled in Romans (9:27-28; Isa. 10:22-23).

‘A remnant shall be saved’ – the doctrine of the remnant always refers to Judah and the other tribes of Israel, never to Gentiles or the Christian body of Christ. It teaches that God is obligated to save a remnant of all Israel, so as to preserve their line to eventually fulfil with them the covenants made with Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and David. God promised an eternal line to these men, and He promised their descendants an eternal land (Gen. 12:1-3, 7; 13:14-17; 15:18-21; 17:2-8, 19; 21:12; 22:17-18; 26:3-4; 28:3-4, 28:13-15; 2Sam. 7:1-29). God often predicted the deliverance and preservation of a remnant of the thirteen tribes and their final and eternal restoration under their Messiah (Isa. 1:9; 10:20-22; 11:10-12, 16; 38:1-22; 46:3; Jer. 23:3; 31:7; 39:9; 40:11; Ezek. 6:8-10; Joel 2:32; Mic. 2:12; 5:3-8; Zeph. 2:7-9; 3:13; Zech. 8:6-12; Rom. 9:27; 11:5; Rev. 12:17). According to Isaiah 1:9, Isaiah predicted that a very small remnant would be saved in the coming destruction of Judah and Jerusalem; otherwise Israel would have been totally destroyed like Sodom and Gomorrah.

‘Except the Lord of Sabaoth had left us a seed, we had been as Sodom, and been make like unto Gomorrah’ this is the 6th Old Testament prophecy fulfilled in Romans (9:29; Isa. 1:9).

‘Sabaoth’ this term is often used in the Old Testament of God who is Lord of hosts, or Lord of armies, who has infinite power to rule the nations and punish the wicked (1Sam. 1:3, 11; 4:4; 15:2; etc.).

Vessels

Romans 9:19-24 Thou will say then unto me, Why does he yet find fault? For who has resisted his will? Nay but, O man, who are thou that replies against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why has thou made me thus? Has not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour? What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction: And that he might make known the riches of his glory on the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory, Even us, whom he has called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles? 

‘Thou wilt say then unto me, Why does he yet find fault? For who has resisted his will? Nay but, O man, who are thou that replies against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why has thou made me thus? Has not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour? What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction: and that he might make known the riches of his glory in the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory, even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles?’ Here the Jews argue again, as they did in Romans 3:7. Paul answers by questions (9:20-24). Who are you to reply against God? Who are you to blame God for your sinfulness? Cannot God deal with you as is necessary (Jer. 18:1-17)? If God still wants to save people who will obey Him, Jews or Gentiles, is that not His right? If He has to damn those who harden themselves may He not do so without our criticism?

‘Vessels of wrath fitted to destruction’ – vessels of wrath are Jews who were: stubborn (9:6); proud (9:31); rebellious (9:32); ignorant (10:3); jealous (10:19); angry (10:19); disobedient(10:21); blind (11:7); fallen (11:12); cast away (11:15); broken off (11:20); spared not (11:21); unbelieving (11:23); cut off (11:24).

‘The riches of his glory’- True riches that are mentioned in Scripture: Riches of His grace (Eph. 1:7); the riches of the glory of the inheritance in the saints (Eph. 1:18); the unsearchable riches of Christ (Eph. 3:8); the riches of glory (Eph. 3:16; Rom. 9:23); the riches of His goodness (Rom. 2:4); the riches of wisdom, knowledge (Rom. 11:33); the riches in glory (Php. 4:19); the riches of the glory of the mystery of Christ in you (Col. 1:27); the riches of the full assurance of understanding of God’s mystery (Col. 2:2); the reproach of Christ had greater riches than that what was in Egypt (Heb. 11:26).

‘Vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory’ – these are the Jew and Gentile converts to Christianity (9:23-24).

God that Shows Mercy

Romans 9:14-18 What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? God forbid. For he said to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion. So then it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy. For the scripture said unto Pharaoh, Even for this same purpose have I raised thee up, that I might show my power in thee, and that my name might be declared throughout all the earth. Therefore has he mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardened. 

‘What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God?’ These questions are answered with another “God forbid.” There is no unrighteousness with God if He sees the dispositions of two boys and chooses on the basis of what He can foresee in each one. So with God’s present dealings with Israel and the Gentiles. If He sees that Jews will be continually rebelling against Him and the Gentiles will not, can He not act accordingly without unrighteousness? God is not responsible for the acts of Esau or Jacob; Jews or Gentiles. He had to make the choice of Jacob over Esau due to the dispositions and lives of the boys. So now, He has to set aside Israel, due to her ever-increasing rebellion of over 1,800 years. The only thing left for Him to do is to use the Gentiles if they will carry out His program (Matt. 21:33-45).

‘I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion’ Here we see that God is sovereign over His mercy. He has laid down His terms of mercy and compassion and will not dispense with either until people meet His terms. He will not save one soul without repentance and continued conformity to His will, nor will He damn one soul that will meet His terms.

‘Even for this same purpose have I raised thee up, that I might show my power in thee, and that my name might be declared throughout all the earth’ quoted from Exodus 9:16. Here we have an instance of a wicked king resisting God’s will to the point of destruction. At many points in God’s dealings with Pharaoh, the king could have submitted and escaped judgment. But he was too stubborn to do so and therefore God could not do otherwise than punish him for his sins and resistance.

‘Therefore has he mercy on whom he will have mercy’ this is the fourth time that we can conclude that God has been fair in His dealings. God was righteous in choosing: Isaac over Ishmael (9:7-8; Gen. 17:1-27); Jacob over Esau (9:9-13; Gen. 25:1-34); the righteous over the sinners in Israel (9:14-16; Ex. 32:32-33; 33:19); Israel over Pharaoh and the Egyptians (9:17-18; Ex. 7:1-14:31).

Paul next applies all these instances to God’s present dealings with Jews and Gentiles. He concludes that, since it was the only just and righteous thing to do in the above four cases, it is only just and righteous of God to cut off Israel and choose the Gentiles to carry on His program (9:19-11:36).

‘Hardened’ God hardens on the same grounds of showing mercy. If men will accept mercy He will give it to them. If they will not, thus hardening themselves He is only just and righteous in judging them. People are privileged to humble themselves and seek mercy or exalt themselves and refuse mercy. Mercy is the result of a right attitude, and hardening is the result of stubbornness or the wrong attitude toward God. It is like the clay and the wax in the sun. The same sunshine hardens one and softens the other. The responsibility is with the materials, not with the sun. People are more responsible than these materials, for they have wills to make proper choices. The only sense in which God hardened Pharaoh was in giving him the occasion to harden his own heart or obey. Such is the choice all people have to make daily (2Cor. 2:15-17; Ps. 81:11-16).

The Truth in Christ

Romans 9:1-5 I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Ghost, That I have great heaviness and continual sorrow in my heart. For I could wish that myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my kinsmen according to the flesh: Who are Israelites; to whom pertained the adoption, and the glory, and the covenants, and the giving of the law, and the service of God, and the promises; Whose are the fathers, and of whom as concerning the flesh Christ came, who is over all, God blessed for ever. Amen. 

‘Say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Ghost’ In Romans 1-8, we see prove that God’s grace extends to both Jews and Gentiles who believe. Romans 9-11 deals with the Jews and shows why they were rejected and cut off by God and why and how the Gentiles were called and elected to partake of gospel benefits.

‘Heaviness and continual sorrow in my heart’ sorrow and continued pangs.

‘I could wish that myself were accursed’ – this merely shows Paul’s willingness to be cursed, not it is necessity (John 15:13).

‘Adoption’ the Jews was all adopted by God (Ex. 4:22; Deut. 14:1; 32:18; Jer. 31:9; Hos. 11:1). In Exodus 4:22 we see that God calls the nation of Israel His son and firstborn as contrasted with the firstborn of Egypt. Pharaoh would understand this fully, for he himself was called son of Ra, or beloved of his god. God was telling him that He loved Israel as he himself loved his firstborn (Ex. 4:23). The whole life of the Israelites was regulated by this principle: You are the children of the Lord your God (Deut. 14:1; Ps. 87:6). God says He birthed Israel (Deut. 32:18). Isaac is spoken of as being born “after the Spirit” (Gal. 4:28-29). They were children of God by the new birth in the same sense that men are born again today, which is by adoption (8:15; 9:4; Gal. 4:5; Eph. 1:4).

‘Glory’ this refers to the Divine Presence (Ex. 16:7, 10; 24:16-17; 40:34-35; Lev. 9:6, 9:23; Num. 14:10, 21; 16:19, 42; Deut. 5:24; 1Sam. 4:21-22; 1Kin. 8:11; etc.).

‘Covenants’ the ones made with Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, David, and others. ‘Law’ – the law was only for Jews (2:12-16; 3:2; 9:4; Deut. 5:3; 29:14). ‘Service of God’ – the rituals of the law (Leviticus 1-12; etc.). ‘The promises’ of Canaan, Messiah, Kingdom, etc.

‘Fathers’ Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and 12 sons.

‘Concerning the flesh Christ came’ – according to human nature (9:3-5; 1Tim. 3:15; Heb. 2:7-18; 1Jn. 4:2) Jesus came in the flesh (Matt. 1:1, 6).

‘Came, who is over all’ – a true Jew is not the one who is circumcised in the flesh, neither is true circumcision in the flesh. A true Jew is one that has inward circumcision of the heart and in the spirit and has more than an outward cutting in the flesh and a profession of truth. This does not teach that every Christian is a Jew, but to be a true Jew one must be of the seed of Abraham, and have circumcision of the heart, and be a child of the promise (2:28-29; 9:6-7).

I am Persuaded

Romans 8:36-39 As it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter. Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord. 

‘As it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter’ the first Old Testament prophecy fulfilled in Romans from Psalm 44:22.

Eight facts about Christian suffering are given: Suffering is not strange or unusual for Christians (1Pet. 4:12; 2Tim. 3:12). One should rejoice when a partaker of the sufferings of Christ (1Pet. 4:13; Matt. 5:10). The greater the suffering the greater the joy and glory (8:17-18; 1Pet. 4:13). Besides the greater glory to come the Christian has the Holy Spirit upon him now to enable him to endure (8:26-27; 1Pet. 4:14;). Christian sufferings glorify God (8:17-18; 1Pet. 4:14). It is an honor, not a shame, to suffer as a Christian (1Pet. 4:16). Though sufferings begin with Christians, they end in an eternal weight of damnation to the ungodly (1Pet. 4:17-18). Sufferings should be borne by Christians, in patience as in the will of God, realizing that God is always faithful to His own in their sufferings (1Pet. 4:19; 1Cor. 10:13).

Ten rewards for Christian suffering are noted: Greater glory in heaven (2Cor. 4:17); eternal consolation (2Cor. 1:7); making Jesus known (2Cor. 4:11); life to others (2Cor. 4:12); making grace manifest (2Cor. 4:15); guarantee of judgment (2Thess. 1:5); reign with Christ (2Tim. 2:12); the Holy Spirit upon us (1Pet. 4:14); glory to God (1Pet. 4:16) and great joy (1Pet. 4:13-14).

Christian suffering does not consist of: Suffering for murder, as a thief, or for being an evildoer or a busybody (1Pet. 4:15); or for suffering for any crime listed in Romans 1:18-32; 1Corinthians 6:9-11 and Galatians 5:19-21

Christian suffering does consist of: Persecution for righteousness (Matt. 5:10; 13:21; Mark 10:30; John 15:20); reviling and slander (Matt. 5:11-12; 10:25; Acts 13:45; 1Pet. 4:4); false accusations (Matt. 10:17-20); scourgings for Christ (Matt. 10:17); rejection by people (Matt. 10:14); hatred by the world (Matt. 10:22; John 15:18-21); hatred by relatives (Matt. 10:21-36); martyrdoms (Matt. 10:28; Acts 7:58); temptations (Luke 8:13; Jas. 1:2-16); shame for His name (Acts 5:41); imprisonments (Acts 4:3; 5:18; 12:4); tribulations (Acts 14:22; 2Thess. 1:4); stonings (Acts 14:19; 2Cor. 11:25); beatings (Acts 16:23; 2Cor. 11:24-25); being a spectacle to people (1Cor. 4:9); misunderstanding, necessities, defamation, and despisings (1Cor. 4:10-13); trouble, affliction, distresses, tumults, labours, watchings, fastings, and evil reports (2Cor. 6:8-10; 11:26-28); reproaches (Heb. 13:13; 1Pet. 4:14); trials (1Pet. 1:7; 4:12); satanic opposition (Eph. 4:27; 6:12); groaning and travailing because of the curse (8:17-26).

‘For I am persuaded’ in Romans 8:38-39 Paul explains that, in view of his doctrines before stated, he is personally persuaded that nothing will be able to separate him from the love he has for God and Christ.

‘Principalities’ the satanic powers of Ephesians 2:2 and 6:12.

‘Creature’ any thing in creation.

‘Separate us from the love of God’ one who lives and walks in the Spirit, will not be separated by any of the 17 things of Romans 8:35-39 any more than he will be moved to commit the 17 things of Galatians 5:19-21. The secret of victory and absolute assurance for the believer is to walk as taught in Romans 6:14-23; 8:1-13 and Galatians 5:16-26.

The Spirit Also Helps

Romans 8:25-28 But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it. Likewise the Spirit also helps our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself makes intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. And he that searches the hearts knows what is the mind of the Spirit, because he makes intercession for the saints according to the will of God. And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. 

‘Spirit also helps our infirmities’  the blessings of the Holy Spirit are noted as follows: He sets free from sin (8:2); He cancels death penalty (8:2); He fulfils righteousness (8:4-5); He indwells believers (8:9-11); He gives life (8:10); He quickens the mortal body (8:11); He mortifies sinful members (8:13); He leads children of God (8:14); He adopts into God’s family (8:15); He bears witness of sonship (8:16); He helps infirmities (8:26) and He makes intercession for saints (8:26).

‘Helps’ [Greek: sunantilambanomai] joint help. It is the assistance afforded by any two persons to each other, who mutually bear the same load or carry it between them.

‘Infirmities’ our physical, mental, or moral weakness or flaws.

‘For we know not what we should pray for as we ought’ we would make many mistakes in prayer if the Spirit did not inspire us with proper desires and help us fulfil those desires in the will of God.

‘Itself’ Himself, for He is a person. It is of the greatest importance that we believe in the divinity of the Holy Spirit, and also His personality. It is only when we learn these truths that we can give Him the honour, worship, adoration, and personal respect that we give to God. We must learn that the Holy Spirit is not a mere power that we need to get hold of and use, but we must learn that He is a person who is infinitely wise, holy, just, and gracious, and who seeks to get hold of us and use us. We must become acquainted with Him as a person and not merely as an influence or power derived from a person. The following points prove that He is a real person: Personal names are given to Him; personal pronouns are used of Him (John 14:16-26; 15:26; 16:7-15); personal attributes are ascribed to Him; personal works are ascribed to Him; personal references are made concerning Him; personal treatment is ascribed to Him. He can be resisted (Acts 7:51); tempted (Acts 5:9); grieved (Eph. 4:30); lied to (Acts 5:3-4); blasphemed (Matt. 12:31-32); insulted (Matt. 12:31-32; Heb. 6:4-6; 10:26-29); quenched (1Thess. 5:19); vexed (Ps. 78:40; Isa. 63:10); quieted (Zech 6:8); fellowshipped (Php. 2:1); and otherwise mistreated or obeyed like any other person. In the Holy Spirit’s relationship to men, He is spoken of as searching hearts, regenerating, sanctifying, helping, convicting, teaching, quickening, guiding, witnessing, interceding, revealing, working, hearing, speaking, helping, communing, appointing, commanding, counselling, comforting, inspiring, assuring, calling, hearing, and in many ways acting as a real person.

‘Intercession’ [Greek: huperentungchano] to apply one’s self to intercede for another.

‘Groanings’ [Greek: stenagmos] unutterable gushing of the heart.

‘He that searches the hearts knows what is the mind of the Spirit’ this is no doubt Christ who knows the mind of the Spirit. It would seem out of place to state that the Spirit knows His own mind. All three persons of the Trinity search hearts: God the Father (1Chron. 28:9; Jer. 17:10); the Son (Rev. 2:23); and the Spirit (1Cor. 2:10).

‘Intercession’ [Greek: entungchano] to intercede; to act as an agent or manager in all phases of salvation and dealings with God (8:27, 34; 11:2; Heb. 7:25). Translated “deal with” in Acts 25:24.

‘Work together’ [Greek: sunergeo] While all things are working, God’s providence is working on behalf of them who love God and who walk obediently according to His purpose.

Have the Firstfruits of the Spirit

Romans 8:20-24 For the creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but by reason of him who hath subjected the same in hope, Because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and travails in pain together until now. And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body. For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man sees, why doth he yet hope for? 

‘Vanity’ [Greek: mataiotes] disappointing misery. People became vain willingly but became subject to misery unwillingly.

‘Delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God’ this refers to the renovation of the heavens and earth by fire when creation will be rid of all bondage of corruption and made new for the eternal perfect state (2Pet. 3:10-13; Heb. 1:10-12; 12:25-28; Isa. 65:17; 66:22-24; Rev. 21-22).

‘Corruption’ [Greek: phthora] moral corruption, decay, ruin, depravity, wickedness (8:21; 1Cor. 15:42, 50; Gal. 6:8; 2Pet. 1:4; 2:12, 19). Also translated “perish” (Col. 2:22) and “be destroyed” (2Pet. 2:12).

‘The glorious liberty of the children of God’ literally, “freedom of the glory of the children of God – the glory of eternity” (8:18; 1Cor. 2:9).

‘Groans and travails in pain’ Groans and toils in labour and hardship.

‘Not only they, but ourselves also’ – not only the corrupt, depraved creations but we who are redeemed also suffer and wait for the final redemption of the body (1Cor. 15:51-58; Php. 3:21).

‘The firstfruits of the Spirit’ – the first blessings of the outpoured Spirit upon all flesh. Greek: aparche used of the first of several kinds of blessings (8:23; 11:16; 16:5; 1Cor. 15:20, 23; 16:15; Jas. 1:18; Rev. 14:4).

‘Groan’ [Greek: stenazo] to sigh deeply, bewail (8:23; Mark 7:34; 2Cor. 5:2, 4; Heb. 13:17; Jas. 5:9).

‘Adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body’ this adoption refers to the change of our bodies from mortality to immortality. Just like one is adopted from one family to another, saints are to be adopted physically into the family of immortal beings (Php. 3:21; 1Cor. 15:51-58).

‘For we are saved by hope’ in the final analysis, present salvation is a hope. Many things can happen before the final change to immortality and eternal life.

Sons of God

Romans 8:12-14 Therefore, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. For if you live after the flesh, you shall die: but if you through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, you shall live. For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. 

‘Therefore, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh’ – So then, we owe the flesh nothing. It has no more control of our lives. We must not live in the sins of the flesh or we shall die. But if we will put to death the practices of the flesh by the Spirit, we shall live (8:12-13; Gal. 5:16-26; Col. 3:5-10).

The Flesh and Spirit life contrasted: The Fleshly Life: Minds things of flesh; carnally minded; spiritually dead; enmity to God; not subject to God; cannot be subject; cannot please God; not in the Spirit; not Christ’s; body alive to sin; spirit dead to God; no Christ; sinful life; no Holy Spirit; no physical quickening; debtor to flesh; no help from Spirit; the end is death. The Spiritual Life: minds things of Spirit (8:5); spiritually minded; alive (8:6); no enmity (8:7); subject to God; can be subjected; can please God (8:8); in the Spirit; is Christ’s (8:9); dead to sin; alive to God; Christ in life (8:10); righteous life; Spirit indwelling; a physical quickening; not a debtor (8:12); help from Spirit (8:13); the end is life.

‘Led by the Spirit of God’ – it is imperative for the child of God to be led by the Spirit, to live and walk in the Spirit, and to meditate on His Word and to obey it – if he is to have success and live a Christian life (8:1-16; Gal. 5:16-26; Jos. 1:8; Ps. 1:3-4). To be led by the Spirit one must live in obedience to all that is commanded to Christian living and behaviour in the Word of God – not to make decisions and then claimed to be led by the Spirit in them. God will not make our decisions for us, but can give us clarity when we know Him in our choices (Pro. 3:3-7).

‘The sons of God’ even so, we were children under bondage to the law until Christ came to redeem us from the law, that we might become adopted sons of God and free from the law (Gal. 4:3-7). Sons by adoption (8:15; Gal. 4:5; Eph. 1:5), not by begetting as in the case of Christ, who is the only begotten Son of God (John 1:14, 18; 3:16, 18).

The Things of the Spirit

Romans 8:4-5 That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit. 

‘Walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit’ by the walk of Christ in real flesh and yet without sin, He condemned sin in all flesh and made a way whereby no flesh had to continue in sin (6:1-23; 8:1-13; 2Cor. 5:17-18; 10:4-6; Gal. 5:16-26).

‘Mind’ [Greek: phroneo] set affections on. Those who set their affections on the sins of the flesh of Galatians 5:19-21; 1Corinthians 6:9-11; Colossians 3:5-10; Romans 1:29-32; Mark 7:19-21 will naturally fulfil them (Jas. 1:13-15). Those who set their affections on the things of the Spirit of Galatians 5:22-23; 1Corinthians 12:4-11; Colossians 3:12-14 will naturally fulfil them and such will not commit sin.

Many reasons are given in Romans that we should not continue living in sin: Death to sin nullifies it (6:2-3); resurrection from spiritual death (6:4-5); we walk in newness of life (6:4); death to sin and resurrection from sin means walking like Christ (6:5; 1Pet. 2:21-22; 1Jn. 2:6; 4:6, 17); the old man is crucified and dead (6:6; Eph. 4:22-24; 1Jn. 5:18); the body of sin is destroyed, that henceforth we should not sin (6:6); we are freed from sin (6:7, 18, 22); faith counts sin dead (6:8); sin has no dominion over us (6:9); sin not to reign in the body (6:12); the body must not yield to sin (6:13); married to Christ, not sin (7:4); we walk in the Spirit (8:1-4); we are made free from the law of sin (8:2); we are spiritually minded (8:6); Christ is in us, not sin (8:10); we are not debtors to sin (8:12); the Spirit mortifies sin in us (8:13); we have Spirit of freedom (8:15); intercession of Christ and the Holy Spirit keeps us (8:26-27, 34).

No Condemnation

Romans 8:1-2 There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death. 

‘Now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus’ this proves that the experience of Romans 7:7-24 was not Paul’s at the time of the writing of Romans, for several reasons: Paul had no condemnation (8:1); Paul was free from the law of sin (8:2); Paul was free from eternal death (8:2); Paul’s sin condemned in his flesh (8:3); Paul was fulfilled righteousness (8:4); Paul had life and peace (8:6); Paul was Spirit-filled (8:9-11); Paul’s body was dead to sin (8:10); Paul’s flesh was crucified (8:12-13); Paul was walking in the Spirit and not after the flesh (8:1-4; Gal. 5:16-26).

‘In Christ Jesus’ we find many blessings in Christ: Redemption (Rom. 3:24; 1Cor. 1:30); freedom from condemnation (Rom. 8:1); spirit of life (Rom. 8:2); love of God (Rom. 8:39; 1Tim. 1:14); truth (Rom. 9:1); unity (Rom. 12:15; Gal. 3:28); faith (Acts 24:24; 1Tim. 3:13); sanctification (1Cor. 1:2, 30); wisdom (1Cor. 1:30; 4:10); righteousness (1Cor. 1:30); begetting (1Cor. 4:15); hope (1Cor. 15:19); security in death (1Cor. 15:18); resurrection (1Cor. 15:1-58; 1Thess. 4:1-18); joy (1Cor. 15:31); establishment in God (2Cor. 1:21); triumph (2Cor. 2:14); the uncorrupted Word (2Cor. 2:17); the law abolished (2Cor. 3:6-15); being a new creation (2Cor. 5:17-18); simplicity (2Cor. 11:3); liberty (Gal. 2:4); all spiritual blessings (Eph. 1:3); power (Eph. 1:20); heavenly places (Eph. 2:6); nearness to God (Eph. 2:13); eternal purpose (Eph. 3:11); self-humbling (Php. 3:14); higher calling (Php. 3:14); perfection (Col. 1:28); eternal life (2Tim. 1:11); grace (2Tim. 2:1); salvation (2Tim. 2:10) and preservation (Jude 1:1).

‘Law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death’ there are eight laws mentioned in Romans: the Law of Moses (2:12; 3:19; 7:12); the law of nature (2:14-15); the law of faith (3:27; 4:3-5, 11-24); the law of the mind (7:16, 21, 23); the law of sin (8:2, 23, 25); the law of righteousness (9:31); the law of God (7:22, 25); the law of the Spirit of life, that is, the Holy Spirit that works through the redemption of Christ to make free from, and to cancel the law of sin and death in all who are in Christ (8:2).