Persuaded of You

Romans 15:14-16 And I myself also am persuaded of you, my brethren, that you also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another. Nevertheless, brethren, I have written the more boldly unto you in some sort, as putting you in mind, because of the grace that is given to me of God, That I should be the minister of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles, ministering the gospel of God, that the offering up of the Gentiles might be acceptable, being sanctified by the Holy Ghost. 

‘Persuaded of you, my brethren, that you also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.’ Paul persuaded of seven things: that God would fill them with joy; that God would fill with peace; that faith would abound in hope; that they had Spiritual power, that they were filled with goodness (15:14), that they were filled with knowledge and that they were capable of ministering.

This persuasion is no more a definite law or a guarantee that such is true of every Christian than that of Romans 8:38-39. Both passages reveal possibilities for all Christians which should be normal in every life, but some are not so persuaded as Paul was.

‘Boldly unto you in some sort, as putting you in mind, because of the grace that is given to me of God.’ I have written freely to you in view of my apostolic office to the Gentiles. I am commissioned by Jesus Christ to minister to you Gentiles the gospel of God – that your consecration may be acceptable to God, being sanctified by the Holy Spirit (15:15-16).

‘Sanctified’ [Greek: hagiazo] to hallow (Matt. 6:9; Luke 11:2); be holy (Rev. 22:11); and sanctify or consecrate – set apart for a sacred purpose (Matt. 23:17, 19; John 10:36; 17:17, 19; Acts 20:32; 26:18; Rom. 15:16; 1Cor. 1:2; 6:11; 7:14; Eph. 5:26; 1Thess. 5:23; 1Tim. 4:5; 2Tim. 2:21; Heb. 2:11; 9:13; 10:10, 14, 29; 13:12; 1Pet. 3:15; Jude 1:1). The Greek word for “sanctify” is hagiazo, meaning to separate from a profane to a sacred use; to consecrate self wholly to God and His service. The primary meaning is separation, not making holy. It means to make holy only when the person or thing sanctified needs to be cleansed from sin or defilement in order to be fit to be separated unto God and His service. Material things such as a day (Gen. 2:3); the tabernacle (Ex. 29:43-44); clothes (Lev. 8:30); houses (Lev. 27:9-29); or the temple (2Chron. 7:16-20) must be cleansed from all defilement in order to be fit to be presented to God for His holy uses. God’s name (Ezek. 36:23); God (1Pet. 3:15); Christ (John 10:36; 17:19); or the already cleansed disciples (John 13:10; 15:3; 17:2, 6, 14, 16) need not be cleansed from sin. To sanctify means to set apart from other uses to God’s particular use, not to cleanse from sin or rid of carnal nature (sometimes called “the old man” or Adamic nature). Even Christ, the Sinless One, was sanctified (John 10:36; 17:19). Where humans are concerned one begins to be sanctified when he begins to consecrate his life to God, and the process is continued as he continues in his dedication (1Cor. 1:30; 6:11; 2Thess. 2:13; 1Jn. 1:7-9; 3:8-10; 5:1-4, 18).

Sin is not necessarily involved in sanctification, because the word means setting apart. God has sanctified both people and material things, and even immaterial things.

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