Death by Sin

Romans 5:12-14 Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned: For until the law sin was in the world: but sin is not imputed when there is no law. Nevertheless death reigned from Adam to Moses, even over them that had not sinned after the similitude of Adam’s transgression, who is the figure of him that was to come. 

‘Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned.’ In Romans 5:12-21, Paul shows that the consequences of Christ’s obedience extend as far as Adam’s disobedience. Gentiles are descendants of Adam and partake of his sin and its consequences, so they are free to partake of the redemption of Christ. This again puts the Gentiles on an equal basis with Jews in Adam, Abraham, and Christ. Sin is of universal effect. From Adam, all people derive their beings (Acts 17:26). The whole race was in his loins when he sinned. He was its spiritual, moral, and physical fountainhead and its sole representative. He did not act as a single person but as the whole race. When he fell he sinned for all. When God contracted with him, it was a contract for the whole race. His progeny became a part of the covenant and blessings if he obeyed and of the curses, if he sinned.

Ten facts about sin: Sin came to the world by one man. It was not in the world at creation. Sin came from outside the world and caused death to enter the race. Sin is universal in effects (Rom. 5:12). It was here 2,500 years before Moses. It is not imputed without law and did not come by Moses’ law. Penalty came before Moses’ law. Both sin and death came by Adam’s transgression of Genesis 2:17.

‘Similitude of Adam’s transgression’ death did not come by personal sin, as it did in the case of Adam. Death passed upon all people because of Adam’s sin (Gen. 2:17; Rom. 5:12-21).

‘Figure’ [Greek: tupos] an outline, sketch; to describe in outline. The idea is that of making a contrasting outline of Christ.

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